Sustainability

Fast-charging electric vehicles and the new gadgets focused on smarter healthcare

  • 15 February 2021
  • 5 min read

A potential game-changer for electric vehicles, new developments in telemedicine and why companies need a broader focus on diversity. Our round-up of provoking thoughts, penetrating insights and digital curiosities.

Five-minute charge for electric cars

Electric vehicles could take as little time to charge as it takes to fill up a petrol vehicle as new fast-charging batteries become a reality, according to The Guardian. A new lithium-ion battery that can be fully charged in five minutes has been developed – and crucially, it can be manufactured on standard factory production lines. This should help overcome many drivers’ concerns of an electric vehicle running out of juice during a long journey, it says.

Latest healthcare gadgets on display

Health and fitness gadgets and domestic robots were among the new inventions unveiled at the 2021 Consumer Electronics Show, the industry event which was held virtually this year, Engadget reports. Inventions included a navigation tool for the visually impaired, a robot that can perform household tasks for people with disabilities and the next generation of robot vacuum cleaners. The event also showcased new developments in telemedicine such as a blood pressure monitor that sends data to doctors, so patients do not need face-to-face check-ups and a non-invasive blood glucose monitor, alongside on-demand fitness services with wearable sensors to track movement.

Why firms may need a broader diversity focus

Corporate recruitment policies that focus on diversity have not necessarily helped create a more inclusive environment, according to the Harvard Business Review. It said that the language companies use is also key, as the term “diverse” can overlook individual characteristics and make people stand out, and businesses instead should look to create better conditions where minorities can thrive.

Ice melting at faster rate

The rate at which ice sheets and glaciers are melting each year has jumped 57% in the past 30 years, new research has found. Yale Environment 360 reports that the world has lost an estimated 28 trillion metric tons of ice since the mid-1990s as the global temperature rises. The world’s sea level has also risen by 1.36 inches during that time.

    Disclaimer

    This document is for informational purposes only and does not constitute investment research or financial analysis relating to transactions in financial instruments as per MIF Directive (2014/65/EU), nor does it constitute on the part of AXA Investment Managers or its affiliated companies an offer to buy or sell any investments, products or services, and should not be considered as solicitation or investment, legal or tax advice, a recommendation for an investment strategy or a personalized recommendation to buy or sell securities.

    Due to its simplification, this document is partial and opinions, estimates and forecasts herein are subjective and subject to change without notice. There is no guarantee forecasts made will come to pass. Data, figures, declarations, analysis, predictions and other information in this document is provided based on our state of knowledge at the time of creation of this document. Whilst every care is taken, no representation or warranty (including liability towards third parties), express or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained herein. Reliance upon information in this material is at the sole discretion of the recipient. This material does not contain sufficient information to support an investment decision.

    All investment involves risk , including the loss of capital. The value of investments .and the income from them can fluctuate and investors may not get back the amount originally invested.